Camp Eureka: June 2016 – Curriculum

Summer Camp Eureka Curriculum (2016)

Structure Camp Instructor: Caleb Rogers

Aerodynamics Camp Instructor: Dennis Palad

Assistant Camp Instructors:

  • Ina Klasner
  • Joshua Wilson
Key Points to Include:

  • Engineering Project Centered
  • Engineering Process
  • Classroom Setting
  • Group Activities
  • End of Camp; Displays and Activities

Materials Needed:

  • 10-15 Mentors
  • 300 Toothpicks
  • 250 Straws
  • 150 Pipe Cleaners
  • 10 Nothing But Net balls
  • 7 boxes Markers/Colored Pencils
  • 35+ sheets Copy Paper
  • 10 Transparent, Plastic Containers (22cm x 14 cm x 7.5 cm)
  • 60 inches Aluminum Foil
  • 1 Measuring Cup
  • 70 cups Sand
  • 1 Tape Measurer
  • 55 inches Saran Wrap
  • Cardboard
  • 3 Foam Poster Boards
  • 3 rolls Duct Tape
  • 3 Box Cutters
  • 2 Bottle Rocket Launchers
  • 3 rolls Paper Towels
  • 1 Loading Block
  • 1 Bucket
  • 1 Chain
  • 40 Paper Clips
  • 240 Marshmallows
  • 25 sheets Construction Paper
  • 10+ Scissors
  • 10 feet Scotch Tape
  • 15 containers PlayDoh
  • 50 Water Balloons
  • 1900 Popsicle Sticks
  • 6 Hot Glue Guns
  • 3 bags Hot Glue Gun Sticks
  • 16, 2.5-lb Weights
  • 2 sheets Wrapping Tissue Paper
  • 200 foot String
  • 9 Trash Bags
  • 5 Rulers
  • 5 Permanent Markers
  • 5 Foam Cups
  • 15, 2-L Soda/Water Bottles
  • 15, 1.5-L Soda/Water Bottles
  • 15, 1-L Soda/Water Bottles
  • Generic Prizes
  • 1 Example Bottle Rocket w/Parachute
  • 1 Example Water Balloon Parachute

End Goal:

Structure Session:

Students…

  • Understand weight distribution and why it is important to distribute weight in structures and buildings.
  • Understand why triangles are strong and commonly used for support.
  • Understand compression and tension and when these forces occur.

Aerodynamics Session:

Students…

  • Understand why flight is possible and what restricts it.
  • Understand and are able to demonstrate lift, thrust, drag and pull (gravity/weight).
  • Understand how to use the Engineering Process

 

Rules:

  • Students
    • Respect the Advisors, Mentors, and each other
    • No horseplay: No throwing things at each other, no running around
    • Ask mentors for permission to go drink water or use the bathroom. Mentors should go with the Student.
    • No eating or drinking inside the class; go outside
    • Have a good attitude; no saying “I can’t do it!”, or whining.
    • Do not hurt others, with physical objects, or your words.
    • Do not go behind the blue tape.
    • Work together with your partners
  • Mentors
    • No Profanity.  Stay focused on Camp; do not go off on a tangent, or get into an argument about things like video games, superheros, etc.
    • Do NOT build your student’s contraptions.
    • Do NOT say demeaning, negative things or putdowns to each other, or to the students.
    • Realize that you lead by example, so be a good example.

Overview:

  • Students will be in groups of 2-3 and will work on guided activities based on the camp that they are participating in. The two camp themes are structure and aerodynamics.

Structure Activities:

  • Paper Strip Tower:  
    • Estimated Time: 65 minutes
    • Materials: two sheets of standard construction paper, scissors, and 1 foot of scotch tape
    • Objective: Guide students through the basics of triangles and weight distribution.  Make the tallest tower that can withstand the force of a fan from across the table.
    • Details: The paper and tape can be used in any way with the exception of taping the tower to the table.
  • Straw and Pipe Cleaner Tower:
    • Estimated Time: 90 minutes
    • Materials: 20 straws, 15 pipe cleaners, and 1 Nothing but Net ball.
    • Objective: Guide students through the basics of triangles and weight distribution.  Get the ball to permanently rest as high atop the tower as possible.
    • Details: A tower will need to support the Nothing but Net ball. The ball is 4 inches in diameter and weighs 0.115 pounds.  The straws and pipe cleaners can be used in any way, but cannot be cut.
  • Water Balloon Cradle:
    • Estimated Time: 95 minutes
    • Materials: 5 straws, 5 pipe cleaners, ½ container Play Dough, scissors, and 1 water balloon.
    • Objective: Make a structure that will protect a water balloon from an approximately 15 foot fall.
    • Details: Fill up the water balloon so that it is the size of a large egg (approx. 3 in. tall and 2 in. wide).  The straws and pipe cleaners can be manipulated in any way.  The structure needs to cradle a water balloon as it falls approximately 15 feet to the ground and has to prevent the balloon from popping.
  • Popsicle Stick Table:
    • Estimated Time: 90 minutes
    • Materials: 50 popsicle Sticks, hot glue gun and glue (determined by mentor), and 16 weights (2.5 pounds each).
    • Objective: Support at least 10 pounds with a table.
    • Details: Make a table out of popsicle sticks that has to be at least 6 inches high, have a base area of 4 inches squared, and have a table top area of 64 inches squared. There has to be at least two different points of contact with the ground.  The table needs to support at least 10 pounds.
  • Dams:
    • Estimated Time: 105 minutes
    • Materials: transparent plastic container, 20 popsicle sticks, 6 inches of aluminum foil, and water (7 cups)
    • Objective: Create a dam that does not leak water to the other side.
    • Details: Make a dam out of popsicle sticks, sealed with aluminum foil, that prevents water from one side it from reaching the other side of the container (5.5 inches long).
  • Tunnels:
    • Estimated Time: 90 minutes
    • Materials: transparent plastic container, 1 container PlayDoh, 7 cups sand, 5.5 inches saran wrap, and 10 toothpicks
    • Objective: Create a tunnel that does not collapse under the weight of sand.
    • Details: The tunnel will be built with Playdoh, saran wrap, and toothpicks and needs to be a minimum of 3 inches wide and 3 inches tall at any given point.  It must span the length of the container (5.5 inches). Throughout the building of the tunnel, students can place the bag of sand onto the tunnel to test their structure. Once the tunnel is completed, the full 7 cups of sand, within the bag, should be able to permanently rest on the tunnel.  The tunnel needs to withstand the weight of the sand without the Playdoh collapsing.

Structure Lessons:

  • Cube and Pyramid Activity
    • Materials: 13 marshmallows and 20 toothpicks
    • Objective: Create a triangular pyramid and a cube out of toothpicks and marshmallows.
    • Description: Show how cubes alone are not as effective as using triangles. By gently shaking a vertices of each figure with their finger, the students will observe that the pyramid holds its shape while the cube does not. In order to make the cube stable, students will create a brace from opposite corners of the cube with two toothpicks connected by another marshmallow. This will make two right triangular pyramids demonstrating once again that triangles provide excellent structure.
  • Popsicle Bridge:
    • Estimated Time: 195 minutes
    • Materials: 60 popsicle sticks, hot glue gun and glue (determined by mentor), 16 weights (2.5 pounds each).
    • Objective: Make a bridge that will spans a 10 inch gap and supports 7.5 pounds of weight.
    • Details: Make a bridge and do a weight test.  The weights will be placed in increments of 2.5 pounds hanging onto the weighting block on the bridge.. The bridge must be 4.25 inches wide at any given point regardless of gaps. The top of the sides of the bridge must be at least 1 popsicle tall by three popsicles(parallel to the bridge). Remember that the area the weight is applied on, the top of the bridge, is at the base of these two sides. Have a 0.78 inch  by 0.78 inch hole in the middle to weight with. Popsicles may be manipulated in any way – can be broken. Then reflect and make a better bridge.  Testing will be a weight competition.

Structure Presentations:

  • Engineering Process Presentation
    • Materials: Engineering Process Slideshow
    • Objective: Teach students how to use the Engineering process
    • Description: Following the slideshow, teach the students 8 steps that would lead to a successful working process

 

Aerodynamics Activities:

  • Glider Activity
    • Materials: Cardboard, Scissors,6.35 x 1.75 inch rectangle of Wrapping Tissue Paper, and Timer
    • Objective: Teach students the basics of thrust.
    • Description: Watch video of the tumblewing glider.  Use wrapping tissue paper to create a mama bug glider. Mama bug gliders are gliders that can be controlled simply by manipulating the air beneath it. Using either an arm or a board the air that movement creates is enough to move the glider.  Fold each of the short edges of the tissue paper in 0.5 in.  The ends should stick up 90 degrees.  Pinch in the center of the long side, approximately 0.5 inch from the edge.  Demonstrate thrust by making the glider fly (drop the glider into the air and begin approaching it with your sheet of cardboard.  Students will have practice time.  All students will compete for whose glider stays in the air the longest.  Students will launch their gliders at the same time and be timed.
  • Water Balloon Parachute:
    • Estimated Time: 80 minutes
    • Materials: 1 water balloon, 8 strings (each 1 foot in length), 2×2’ square of trash bag, water source, ruler, permanent marker, scissors, and 1 foam cup.
    • Objective: Guide students through the basics of drag.  Land the water balloon without having it pop.
    • Details: Empty all the air from the water balloon and fill it with water until it measures approximately 3 inches in height.  Identify what shape the Students want their parachute to be (using the square trash bag). The Students can but do not have to use all the string (it is dependent on the shape they choose).  Create a parachute that can land a water balloon safely to the ground from A-bldg.  Explain to Students why/why not their design works.  
  • Paper Helicopter Activity:
    • Estimated Time: 5 minutes
    • Materials: 40, 7 in x 2.5 in rectangles of copier paper; 40 paper clips; scissors
    • Objective: Create a paper helicopter that effectively spins when dropped.
    • Details: Fold paper in half lengthwise, crease, and unfold.  Cut a little less than halfway down the created crease.  Halfway down the length of the paper, make two small cuts towards the center of the paper.  Fold both sides of the uncut half of the paper into the center.  Fold the two remaining flaps down, in opposing directions.  Crease and open the flaps halfway. Put a paper clip at the center of the bottom of the uncut half of the paper.  Test.

Aerodynamics Lessons:

  • Paper Airplane Activity:
    • Estimated Time: 140 minutes
    • Materials: 4+ sheets of copy paper, handout (sample plane design instructions, aerodynamics principles, set of instructions w/questions), timer (mentor’s phone), and a tape measurer.
    • Objective: Teach students the aerodynamic concepts.  Explain why paper airplanes fly and identify factors that affect flight.
    • Details: Provide students with packet of different types of plane designs and different paper plane design instructions.  Mentors explain as needed.  Students will be allowed 3 trials to test different designs.  Each trial is timed and measures how far the airplane flies.  Mentors prompt questions and review observations (how design affects the flight of the plane) throughout.  All of this will be taught by giving the students 3 trials and have them make observations to what would affect the flight of the airplane.
  • Drag activity:
    • Estimated Time: 2 minutes
    • Materials: Nothing
    • Objective: Learn how drag is affected by the shape of the design.
    • Details: First, have the Students move their hands (palms open, thumbs on top, pinkies on bottom) horizontally.  They should notice some resistance.  Explain that the air is hitting the surface of the palm, which results in the resistance.  Then, have the Students move their hands (palms open and facing down) horizontally.  They should notice less resistance.  Explain that the air is hitting less of your hand, therefore there is less resistance.  Then explain how that relates to the shape of airplanes and rockets.
  • Bottle Rocket w/Parachute
    • Estimated Time: 275 minutes
    • Materials: 3, 2L-soda/water bottles; 3, 1.5L-soda/water bottles; 3, 1L-soda/water bottles; cardboard; foam board; duct tape; water source; 7 water balloons; 4, 2×2 foot squares of trash bags; 32 strings (each 1 foot in length); water source; ruler; permanent marker; and scissors; box cutter
    • Objective: Further teach the aerodynamic concepts.  Create a bottle rocket with an attached parachute that lasts as long as possible in the air without the water balloon popping
    • Details: Expands on the concepts of drag in relation to fin design. Create three bottle rockets with one type of fin for each bottle size.  Choose a shape of the parachute canopy.  Create three parachutes that can attach to the bottle rocket and each safely carry a water balloon.  Empty all the air from the water balloon and fill it with water until it measures approximately 3 inches in height.  Fill the 2L bottles with 1L water.  Fill the 1.5L with 0.75L water.  Fill the 1L bottles with 0.5L water.  Air Pressure for all bottles will be 30 psi  Test.  Create three more bottle rockets with the other fin type, otherwise using the same procedure.  Test.  The parachute on the rocket needs to last as long as possible in the air and the water balloon needs to come down safely along with the bottle rocket. Reflect and determine best design.  Create the design with the remaining materials.  Test.  Make more/replace parachutes and water balloons as needed.

Aerodynamics Presentations:

  • Engineering Process Presentation
    • Materials: Engineering Process Slideshow
    • Objective:Teach students how to use the Engineering process
    • Description: Following the slideshow, teach the students 8 steps that would lead to a successful working process

 

Ice Breakers:

  • Structure Camp:
    • Day 1: Shoe Talk
      • Form into 2 groups
      • Will need a mentor if odd number of Students
      • Each person takes off one shoe and each group forms pile of shoes
      • A person from one group has to randomly select a shoe from the other group’s pile and find its owner
      • Once owner is found, that person has to ask the other a question
      • Repeat until all shoes have been returned to their owner Structure Camp:
    • Day 2: Find your partner(s)
      • Matching fictional characters are written on pieces of paper
      • Each person is assigned a paper
      • They try to figure out what they are and who the people they match are based on asking yes/no questions to the other Students
    • Day 3: Human Rock Paper Scissors
      • Rock, Paper, Scissors played in groups of 3 (2 children and one mentor per group)
      • May involve a mentor if there is an odd number of Students.
      • Use universal symbols, determined by mentors.
      • Groups play against groups
      • Winners play against winners, losers play against losers
    • Day 4: Gimme Gimme
      • Form into three groups
      • Group names: Diamond, Gold, Iron
      • Number of mentors involved dependent on size of camp
      • A mentor asks for something each team has
      • The person who gets the item to the location first wins
  • Aerodynamics Camp:
    • Day 1: Two Truths and a Lie
      • Have a few mentors make a “2 truths & 1 lie” (examples)
      • Let the children figure out which is which
      • Tell children to try it amongst themselves
      • Mentors+children work together
    • Day 2: Lost on a Deserted Island
      • Go around and talk to everyone and ask them what 3 things they would take with them to a deserted island
    • Day 3: Mingle
      • Moderator asks: What is your favorite….
          • Superhero
          • Food
          • Color
          • Animal
          • School subject
          • Place
          • Game
          • Movie
          • Book
          • Season
          • Flavor of ice cream
      • Students with similar answers from groups
      • Ask one question, discuss, then repeat
    • Day 4: Categories / Similarities
      • Everyone talks with each other to decide 6 similarities everyone has in common
      • Not physical similarities Two Truths and a Lie
      • Have a few mentors make a “2 truths & 1 lie” (examples)
      • Let the children figure out which is which
      • Tell children to try it amongst themselves
    • Mentors+children work together